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PUBLIC MARKS from tadeufilippini with tag "help ubuntu"

2012

Supported Hardware

Supported Hardware Ubuntu does not impose hardware requirements beyond the requirements of the Linux kernel and the GNU tool-sets. Therefore, any architecture or platform to which the Linux kernel, libc, gcc, etc. have been ported, and for which an Ubuntu port exists, can run Ubuntu. Rather than attempting to describe all the different hardware configurations which are supported for Intel x86, this section contains general information and pointers to where additional information can be found.

Printing Ubuntu

Impressão Como posso verificar o nível de tinta/toner da minha impressora?Verifique a quantidade de tinta ou toner que resta nos cartuchos da impressora.

2010

LucidUpgrades/Kubuntu - Community Ubuntu Documentation

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Ubuntu Documentation > Community Documentation > LucidUpgradesKubuntu * LucidUpgrades * Kubuntu For general information or to download a CD see the Kubuntu 10.04 LTS Release Announcement Kubuntu 9.10 to 10.04 LTS Upgrade Upgrade to 10.04 LTS over the Internet: 1) You will be notified in the system tray. Click the icon to start the upgrade

2009

Installation/FromUSBStick - Community Ubuntu Documentation

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* Installation * FromUSBStick Conteúdos 1. Install Ubuntu from a USB stick 2. Tools for creating bootable USB stick from CD images 1. usb-creator (Windows or Linux) 2. UNetbootin (Windows or Linux) 3. Portable Linux 4. Live USB creator (GUI-based, runs from Live CD) 5. isotostick.sh (Command-line shell script, runs from Linux) 6. ubuntu-server-flashdrive-installer.sh (Command-line shell script, runs from Linux) 7. liveusb-creator (from Fedora) 3. Creating bootable USB manually 1. Alternate Install (Ubuntu 9.10) 2. After Installing 3. See also 4. Comments and Troubleshooting Install Ubuntu from a USB stick This pages describes how to install Ubuntu by copying the contents of the installation CD to a USB drive (such as a self-contained flash drive or a Memory Stick or SD card reader) and making the USB drive bootable. This is handy for machines like ultra-portable notebooks that do not have a CD drive but can boot from USB media. The main steps are: * Prepare the USB drive * Boot the computer from your USB drive. * Install Ubuntu as you would from a normal boot CD Note: It is highly recommended to use the latest version of Ubuntu to prepare your USB drive. See also the instructions for USB drives from the official Install Guide. If you have downloaded a .img file, please refer to the .img writing documentation Tools for creating bootable USB stick from CD images

JavaInstallation - Community Ubuntu Documentation

Overview Sun Microsystems have developed Java, which is many things depending on who you ask. It is a language, and an execution environment and probably many more things. On this page Java refers to the software that executes programs compiled to Java byte codes (akin to machine language). Be aware of the Java trap. Although keep in mind that with the GPL licensing of the Sun Java implementation the Java trap is a thing of the past. Even RMS thinks so. Use IcedTea on Ubuntu 7.10 and OpenJDK on Ubuntu 8.04 or later. The first free project to offer substantial parts of Java platform functionality was Guavac. After that the free software movement developed java compilers, most notably the GNU Compiler for Java. GCJ is a front end to the GCC compiler which can natively compile both Java(tm) source and bytecode files. The compiler can also generate class files. Gcjwebplugin is a little web browser plugin to execute Java applets. It is targeted for Mozilla and compatible browsers that support the NPAPI. Others include the Eclipse Java Compiler, which is maintained by the Eclipse Foundation. Eclipse is an open-source Integrated development environment (IDE) written primarily in Java. The Eclipse open source community has over 60 open source projects. OpenJDK is the open source Java, derived from sources which will become OpenJDK 7 in the future.

Java - Community Ubuntu Documentation

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Running Java under Ubuntu In order to run Java programs and Java applets, you must have a Java environment installed. The GCJ flavor of Java is installed as default, and is usually fine for most purposes. If it is not installed, JavaInstallation describes how to install some opensource flavors of Java. You may, however, have a need to run the Sun flavor of Java if something does not work correctly. To get Sun Java under Ubuntu 7.04 or later running on Intel or PowerPC platform, you should enable the Universe repository in Add/Remove programs, and install either the openjdk-6-jre package or the sun-java6-bin package. (Note: PowerPC version is slow). To get Sun Java under Ubuntu 6.06 or 6.10 running on Intel x86 platform, you should enable the Universe repository in Add/Remove programs, and install the sun-java5-bin package. Note: The same commands will work under Xubuntu/Kubuntu (using Add/Remove or the Adept Package Installer). Choosing the default Java to use Just installing new Java flavours does not change the default Java pointed to by /usr/bin/java. You must explicitly set this: * Open a Terminal window * Run sudo update-java-alternatives -l to see the current configuration and possibilities. * Run sudo update-java-alternatives -s XXXX to set the XXX java version as default. For Sun Java 6 this would be sudo update-java-alternatives -s java-6-sun * Run java -version to ensure that the correct version is being called. You can also use the following command to interactively make the change; * Open a Terminal window * Run sudo update-alternatives --config java * Follow the onscreen prompt

HowToMD5SUM - Community Ubuntu Documentation

* HowToMD5SUM Contents 1. md5sum 2. MD5SUM on Linux 1. Check the iso file 2. Check the CD 3. MD5SUM on Mac OS X 4. digest(1) on Solaris 5. MD5SUM on Windows 6. MD5SUM on CD 7. MD5SUM of burnt media 8. External Links The program md5sum is designed to verify data integrity using the MD5 (Message-Digest algorithm 5) 128-bit cryptographic hash. MD5 hashes used properly can confirm both file integrity and authenticity. In terms of integrity, an MD5 hash comparison detects changes in files that would cause errors. The possibility of changes (errors) is proportional to the size of the file; the possibility of errors increase as the file becomes larger. It is a very good idea to run an MD5 hash comparison check when you have a file like an operating system install CD that has to be 100% correct. In terms of security, cryptographic hashes such as MD5 allow for authentication of data obtained from insecure mirrors. The MD5 hash must be signed or come from a secure source (an HTTPS page) of an organization you trust. See the MD5SUMS file for the release you're using under http://releases.ubuntu.com (and optionally the PGP signatures in the MD5SUMS.gpg file), or refer to the secure UbuntuHashes page for the official list of Ubuntu MD5 hashes. While security flaws in the MD5 algorithm have been uncovered, MD5 hashes are still useful when you trust the organization that produces them. Moving to more secure hashes like SHA-256 and Whirlpool is under discussion.

Local Support through Local Community (aka LoCo) Teams | Ubuntu

Home Face-to-Face Local Support Our worldwide network of Local Community ("LoCo") teams is providing a strong backbone to our already vast and extensive Ubuntu community. Many of these teams provide free, face-to-face local support, such as one-on-one troubleshooting, group sessions, and presentations about Ubuntu. Why not go and see the full list of teams! Contents 1. Non-English Support 1. Bengali (Bangladesh) 2. Brazilian 3. Catalan 4. Česky 5. Chinese 6. Croatian 7. Dutch 8. Finnish 9. French 10. German 11. Greek 12. Hebrew and Arabic 13. India (any Indian language) 14. Indonesian 15. Italian 16. Japanese 17. Korean 18. Kurdish 19. Persian (Iran) 20. Portuguese 21. Romanian 22. Russian 23. Slovak 24. Spanish 1. General 2. Argentina 3. Chile 25. Swedish 26. Tamil 27. Turkish 28. Urdu (Pakistan) Non-English Support Support channels on IRC and mailing lists exist for Ubuntu users whose first language is not English. You are welcome to join one of these or start your own. An important part of the Ubuntu manifesto is your ability to use your software in your local language. Part of that is ensuring that Ubuntu includes the best translations available for the Ubuntu desktop software (and you can help to improve those translations). Another part of that commitment is helping to create mailing lists and IRC channels for Ubuntu users in different languages. If you want to start a local team or to join an existing one, visit https://wiki.ubuntu.com/LoCoTeams Bengali (Bangladesh) * Website: http://www.ubuntu-bd.org/ * Forum: http://forum.ubuntu-bd.org/ * IRC: #ubuntu-bd on irc.freenode.net * Mailing list: https://lists.ubuntu.com/mailman/listinfo/ubuntu-bd Brazilian * Website: http://www.ubuntu-br.org * Forums: http://forum.ubuntu-br.org * Wiki documentation: http://wiki.ubuntu-br.org * IRC: #ubuntu-br on chat.freenode.net * Mailing list: http://lists.ubuntu.com/mailman/listinfo/ubuntu-br

Using The Terminal - Community Ubuntu Documentation

Why? "Under Linux there are GUIs (graphical user interfaces), where you can point and click and drag, and hopefully get work done without first reading lots of documentation. The traditional Unix environment is a CLI (command line interface), where you type commands to tell the computer what to do. That is faster and more powerful, but requires finding out what the commands are." -- from man intro(1) For some tasks, especially things like system configuration, it makes sense to use the terminal, and you'll probably have seen instructions on help pages or forums similar to:

Ubuntu Server Guide

Ubuntu Documentation > Ubuntu 9.04 > Ubuntu Server Guide Ubuntu Server Guide Copyright © 2008 Canonical Ltd. and members of the Ubuntu Documentation Project Credits and License Abstract Welcome to the Ubuntu Server Guide! It contains information on how to install and configure various server applications on your Ubuntu system to fit your needs. It is a step-by-step, task-oriented guide for configuring and customizing your system.

Community Documentation - Community Ubuntu Documentation

The Terminal is Your Friend Perhaps the most powerful tool in Linux is your Terminal Program. Before you jump in, take a moment to familiarize yourself with the command line--your invaluable asset in Linux. FAQs Still have questions? You are not alone. Stop by the most common questions that new Ubuntu users frequently ask. Installation * See Installation for both basic and advanced methods of installing Ubuntu, as well as information about supported hardware. * Read the Upgrade Notes to find out how to upgrade your system from older versions of Ubuntu. * For a video tutorial on the full installation process, please visit: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w8a-smrPlvE&hd=1

Image Writer project files

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Download project files After you've downloaded a file, you can verify its authenticity using its MD5 sum . (How do I verify a download?)

Installation/FromImgFiles - Community Ubuntu Documentation

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# Download the desired .img file # Install the usb-imagewriter package * If your release does not include this, download it from Oliver's PPA * If imagewriter fails to launch, you may need to install python glade2 support. Install the python-glade2 package or Run sudo apt-get install python-glade2 * If your release does not include it and you are running 9.04 Jaunty Jackalope then run this command from the console: o sudo apt-get install usb-imagewriter # Open Applications -> Accessories -> Image Writer * KDE users will find this in Applications -> Utilities -> Image Writer * on some usb-imagewriter versions (console command: imagewriter) the application fails to write if the image path contains blank spaces, exiting with "IndexError: list index out of range". Also, in case you prefer to launch it from the command line, don't forget to sudo it, otherwise it will give a permission error. # Insert your flash media # Select the downloaded file and flash device, and click "Write to Device" # Remove your device when the operation is complete

HOWTO Lexmark Printers - Gentoo Linux Wiki

HOWTO Lexmark Printers From Gentoo Linux Wiki Jump to: navigation, search This page has been deleted. The deletion and move log for the page are provided below for reference. * 05:34, 1 June 2009 AllenJB (Talk | contribs) deleted "HOWTO Lexmark Printers" ‎ (No useful content; Page naming conventions) Gentoo Linux Wiki does not have an article with this exact name. Please search for HOWTO Lexmark Printers in Gentoo-Wiki to check for alternative titles or spellings. * Start the HOWTO Lexmark Printers article or add a request for it. * Search for "HOWTO Lexmark Printers" in existing articles. * Look for pages within Gentoo Linux Wiki that link to this title. Other reasons this message may be displayed: * Titles on Gentoo-Wiki are case sensitive except for the first character; please check alternate capitalizations and consider adding a redirect here to the correct title. * If the page has been deleted, check the deletion log, and see Why was my page deleted?.

Wired troubleshooting

Wired troubleshooting If you have a network connection which is not working properly, you can use a few tools to help diagnose what the problem is. Most of the tools in this section require use of the Terminal, which you can open by pressing Applications → Accessories → Terminal. Get information about the current connection ifconfig is intended to allow you to change the settings of your network connections, but it can also be used to list information about the current connection. 1. Press Applications → Accessories → Terminal to open a Terminal 2. Type ifconfig eth1 in the Terminal and press Enter, replacing eth1 with the name of your network interface if it is different. * inet addr gives the current IP address of the connection * HWaddr gives the MAC address of your network device

Chapter 5. Troubleshooting

Table of Contents Wired troubleshooting Get information about the current connection Check if a connection is working properly Wireless troubleshooting Check that the device is on Check for device recognition Using Windows Wireless Drivers Check for a connection to the router Check IP assignment Check DNS IPv6 Not Supported

DSL

Ubuntu Documentation > Ubuntu 9.04 > Internet and Networks > Connecting > DSL DSL 1. Right click the NetworkManager icon and click Edit connections... 2. Click DSL. 3. Click Add.

Documentation for Ubuntu 9.04

Documentation for Ubuntu 9.04 This site is where you can find the official documentation developed and maintained by the Ubuntu Documentation Project. This page contains documentation for Ubuntu 9.04, the latest stable version, released in April 2009. If you can't find what you are looking for here, try the excellent source of community contributed documentation.

DialupModem - Ubuntu Brasil

Conectando à Internet com um modem dialup (analógico) Minha primeira tentativa (mal-sucedida) de ficar online foi com Computador > Configurações do Sistema > Rede. Depois de alguma pesquisa, descobri que esta forma alternativa de ficar online funcionou bem, porque é ainda mais fácil de conectar e desconectar do que seria através do diálogo Rede.

Documentacao/InternetERedes - Ubuntu Brasil

# Instalando o Java - Instalando e configurando o suporte a programas em Java (inclui plugin do Java) # Tim Web - O Tim Web é um plano de conexão móvel lançado pela TIM para transferência de dados. # Claro Web - O Claro Web é um plano de conexão móvel lançado pela Claro para transferência de dados.

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