public marks

PUBLIC MARKS from sbrothier with tag typography

June 2010

Frieze Magazine | Archive | New Faces

(via)
It only takes a glance at the cover of any recent Paris Vogue to see that something odd is afoot. There’s the hair for a start. Veering between the lank and the bushy, it never quite achieves the luxuriant waves that are the norm. All around are quirky touches: idiosyncratic typefaces, hand-drawn motifs and even collage. This may not sound like much, but in the context of fashion magazines Paris Vogue is doing more than bucking a trend; it is attempting to shrug off a genre.

Apple - HTML5

by 3 others
The demos below show how the latest version of Apple’s Safari web browser, new Macs, and new Apple mobile devices all support the capabilities of HTML5, CSS3, and JavaScript. Not all browsers offer this support. But soon other modern browsers will take advantage of these same web standards — and the amazing things they enable web designers to do.

sci.lang.japan : Introduction and Contents

Welcome to the sci.lang.japan Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ). This is a list of questions and answers about the Japanese language originally from the Usenet newsgroup sci.lang.japan.

PingMag - The Tokyo-based magazine about “Design and Making Things” » Archive » The Bunshi School of Edomoji

What vigorous brush strokes! These friendly looking Edomoji, or “Edo characters,” are traditional Japanese fonts that were developed in the Edo Period (1603 to 1868). Today, they haven’t lost their attraction! Now, PingMag talks to self-taught calligrapher Bunshi Tachikawa who got so much into Edomoji that he threw his experience as graphic designer over board and created a brand new style himself – now known as the Bunshi School of Edomoji. A brand new school!

May 2010

Font | MORISAWA

Without difficulty, Japanese people use a combination of four different types of character systems: kanji,hiragana, katakana, and the English alphabet. This is a very unusual system not seen in any other country in the world. Each of the kanji characters, forming the core of the Japanese writing system, usually serves also as a word. Elements of Japanese culture have been embedded in these kanji characters through their forms and images. In addition,most kanji characters have two or more pronunciations and a variety of meanings.

Google Font Directory

by 15 others
The Google Font Directory lets you browse all the fonts available via the Google Font API. All fonts in the directory are available for use on your website under an open source license and served by Google servers.

Typekit and Google Announce Open Source Collaboration « The Typekit Blog

by 2 others
Using real fonts on the web is no longer something to look forward to – the technology is ready, the industry has responded, and designers are building sites with them every day. We are excited to be part of this shift in how the web works, and we’re happy to be able to give back to the community through open source.

Font Finder :: Add-ons for Firefox

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FontFinder is created for designers, developers and typographers. It allows a user to analyze the font information of any element on a page, copy any piece(s) of that information to the clipboard, and perform inline replacements to test new layouts.

April 2010

Helvetireader²

by 10 others (via)
Helvetireader is a hosted user stylesheet for Google Reader served via a user-script. It aims to make the interface a clean, minimal experience where you're not assaulted by an array of colours, social features and buttons (using Shortcuts instead). It's designed for people who just read the latest entries in expanded view without all the other gubbins.

Boing Boing’s Redesign Uncovers the Dark Side of Web Fonts | Webmonkey | Wired.com

So does that mean there isn’t going to be a way to use @font-face until Windows XP is a dim memory? Well you could always use JavaScript to detect the operating system and selectively applying @font-face to an OS that can render it. That (among other things, like licensing complexities) is one of the potential problems startups like the TypeKit project are hoping to solve.

How to Detect Font-Smoothing Using JavaScript

by 1 other (via)
Testing font-smoothing in most Windows web browsers is easy since it can be turned off inside the Display control panel. However, when using Safari for Windows, it is necessary to navigate inside Safari’s Appearance preferences and set the Font-smoothing option to Windows Standard.

Font Squirrel | Create Your Own @font-face Kits

by 14 others
Usage: Click the "Add Fonts" button and select all the TTF and OTF fonts you want in the @font-face kit. Choose your option then click the download button at the bottom. Voila! See the release notes below for updates. The download button won't appear until you check the agreement box.

Mo’ Bulletproofer @Font-Face CSS Syntax

by 1 other (via)
Now that web fonts are supported in Firefox 3.5 and 3.6, Internet Explorer, Safari, Opera 10.5, and Chrome, web authors face new questions: How do these implementations differ? What CSS techniques will accommodate all? Firefox developer John Daggett recently posted a little roundup about these issues and the workarounds that are being explored.

FF DIN Web Pro | Font Download | FontShop

Web fonts are optimized for use on the web and will work only in web browsers.

Buy fonts at FontShop, host them on Typekit « The Typekit Blog

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It’s hard to believe that it has only been three months since we launched Typekit — so much has happened in the webfont world in such a short time. We’ve been inspired recently by beautiful redesigns, increasingly sophisticated browser support, and many more foundries choosing to embrace @font-face.

Standard Time

70 workers are building a wooden 4 x 12 m "digital" time display in real time: a work that involves 1611 changes within 24 hour period. Seamlessly documented and shot on video, a 24 hours movie or clock is now available. Standard Time is an artwork of Mark Formanek, realized by Datenstrudel.

March 2010

My Love/Hate Affair With Typekit – Jeffrey Zeldman Presents The Daily Report

Georgia and Verdana, Lucida and (to a lesser extent) Arial and Times New Roman have served us well. For fifteen years, these cross-platform default fonts have been faithful stewards of our desire to read, write, design, and publish web pages. Yet we designers have always wanted more. As far back as 1994, we hoped for the day when we could brand our layouts as magazine and poster designers do, by setting our pages in Franklin or Garamond, our headlines in Futura or Rosewood. And since 1998, CSS2 has provided a standard way to embed any typeface, not just the fab five, on a web page.

February 2010

H&FJ News | Hoefler & Frere-Jones

The Hamilton Manufacturing Co. traces its roots back to the very first wood types made in the United States. Darius Wells produced the first American wood type in 1828; his business was reorganized into Wells & Webb, then acquired by William Page, later passing back to the Wells family, and finally sold to Hamilton sometime before 1880. The product of this consolidation was a type specimen book issued in 1900, Hamilton’s Catalogue No. 14, which offers a good survey of American display typography of the nineteenth century.

cufón - fonts for the people

by 8 others
Cufón aims to become a worthy alternative to sIFR, which despite its merits still remains painfully tricky to set up and use. To achieve this ambitious goal the following requirements were set: 1. No plug-ins required – it can only use features natively supported by the client 2. Compatibility – it has to work on every major browser on the market 3. Ease of use – no or near-zero configuration needed for standard use cases 4. Speed – it has to be fast, even for sufficiently large amounts of text And now, after nearly a year of planning and research we believe that these requirements have been met.

January 2010

Web Open Font Format for Firefox 3.6 ✩ Mozilla Hacks – the Web developer blog

by 2 others
This article was written by John Daggett. John is a Mozilla contributor and has been working hard with font creators and web developers to improve the state of fonts on the web. This article is a high-level overview of whats different and shows some examples of WOFF in use. A full list of other supporting organizations can be found at the official Mozilla Blog.

Web typography - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Web Open Font Format (WOFF), a format developed during 2009, is essentially a wrapper that contains sfnt-based fonts (TrueType, OpenType or Open Font Format) that have been compressed using a WOFF encoding tool to enable them to be embedded in a web page.[8]. The format uses zip compression[9], typically resulting in a filesize reduction from ttf of over 40%[10] The format has received the backing of many of the main font foundries[11] and, on October 20th, 2009, Mozilla announced that it would provide support for WOFF in Firefox 3.6.[12] During the October 2009 Typ09 conference, Microsoft were reported as saying that they were 'considering' supporting WOFF in Internet Explorer 9.[13] WOFF is "a strong favourite" for standardization by the W3C Web Fonts Working Group.[14]