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PUBLIC MARKS from decembre with tags chrome & dev

This year

DEV - CHROM - 2015 - Six Tips for Chrome DevTools | CSS-Tricks

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This post will cover six popular tips for Chrome DevTools. You may have seen some of these before, but hopefully if you have they'll act as a refresher for what you can do during your Inspect Element journey.

2014

CSS - IMAGES RESPONSIVE - ResponsiveImages.org

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A group of developers working towards a client-side solution for delivering alternate image data based on device capabilities to prevent wasted bandwidth and optimize display for both screen and print.

2010

Use Greasemonkey Scripts In Google Chrome - But, there are some limitations as well (as with Opera — which also supports some greasemonkey scripts) - Chrome does not support @exclude, @require, @resource, unsafeWindow, or any of the special GM_* APIs.

Well, here is how to run userscripts in chrome : * Add this flag to Google Chrome launcher : --enable-user-scripts - Now, create a folder in your user data directory. Name it as User Scripts. - Save your all GM scripts in this folder. - If you want to import all userscripts from Firefox — you need to do it manually. We have shown you the way to backup your Greasemonkey scripts. Just navigate to your GM script folder in Firefox data directory as describe in this post. Now, you can copy and paste every script’s file manuallyAnd, you are done! Restart the chrome — and visit any related site. It is quite possible that your favorite GM Script will do the magic. - Important fact : Chrome supports “Early Injection” – the ability to run scripts very early in the page’s lifecycle. In Firefox, userscripts run after page load. But in chrome, you can set it to run before page load. For this, you need to add an extra line in scripts meta data section : // @run-at document-start

unsafeWindow - Injecting JS functions into the page from a Greasemonkey script on Chrome - Stack Overflow

I have a Greasemonkey script that works just fine in Firefox and Opera. I struggle with getting it to work in Chrome, however. The problem is injecting a function into the page that can be invoked by code from the page. Here's what I'm doing so far: First, I get a helper reference to the unsafeWindow for Firefox. This allows me to have the same code for FF and Opera (and Chrome, I thought).

Greasemonkey comes to Chrome - get your userscripts ready!

Chrome has a secret weapon. His name is Aaron Boodman, and he created Greasemonkey. He now works on the Chrome Extensions team at Google. Even though Greasemonkey on Chrome isn't yet as mature as the Firefox version -- 15-25% of scripts might not work on Chrome yet -- it will definitely get there with Boodman's help. If you need some scripts to get you started, you can scope out Download Squad's 10 Greasemonkey Scripts You Shouldn't Browse Without, or peruse the large selection at userscripts.org.