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PUBLIC MARKS from tadeufilippini with tags "ubuntu netbook" & "ubuntu canonical"

May 2010

Ubuntu Netbook Edition : “Canonical Desktop Experience Team” team

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Ubuntu Netbook Edition 1. “Canonical Desktop Experience Team” team 2. Ubuntu Netbook Edition PPA description Contains the latest packages for Ubuntu Netbook Edition from the Canonical Desktop Experience Team Adding this PPA to your system You can update your system with unsupported packages from this untrusted PPA by adding ppa:canonical-dx-team/une to your system's Software Sources. (Read about installing) Technical details about this PPA This PPA can be added to your system manually by copying the lines below and adding them to your system's software sources. deb http://ppa.launchpad.net/canonical-dx-team/une/ubuntu lucid main deb-src http://ppa.launchpad.net/canonical-dx-team/une/ubuntu lucid main Signing key: 1024R/7AE26941 (What is this?) Fingerprint: B830F373C1A4AB09059A12F8AA2BB78B7AE26941 For questions and bugs with software in this PPA please contact Canonical Desktop Experience Team.

Mark Shuttleworth » Blog Archive » Unity, and Ubuntu Light

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Unity, and Ubuntu Light Monday, May 10th, 2010 A few months ago we took on the challenge of building a version of Ubuntu for the dual-boot, instant-on market. We wanted to be surfing the web in under 10 seconds, and give people a fantastic web experience. We also wanted it to be possible to upgrade from that limited usage model to a full desktop. The fruit of that R&D is both a new desktop experience codebase, called Unity, and a range of Light versions of Ubuntu, both netbook and desktop, that are optimised for dual-boot scenarios. The dual-boot, web-focused use case is sufficiently different from general-purpose desktop usage to warrant a fresh look at the way the desktop is configured. We spent quite a bit of time analyzing screenshots of a couple of hundred different desktop configurations from the current Ubuntu and Kubuntu user base, to see what people used most. We also identified the things that are NOT needed in lightweight dual-boot instant-on offerings. That provided us both with a list of things to focus on and make rich, and a list of things we could leave out. Instant-on products are generally used in a stateless fashion. These are “get me to the web asap” environments, with no need of heavy local file management. If there is content there, it would be best to think of it as “cloud like” and synchronize it with the local Windows environment, with cloud services and other devices. They are also not environments where people would naturally expect to use a wide range of applications: the web is the key, and there may be a few complementary capabilities like media playback, messaging, games, and the ability to connect to local devices like printers and cameras and pluggable media. We also learned something interesting from users. It’s not about how fast you appear to boot. It’s about how fast you actually deliver a working web browser and Internet connection. It’s about how fast you have a running system that is responsive to the needs of the user. Unity: a lightweight netbook interface There are several driving forces behind the result. The desktop screenshots we studied showed that people typically have between 3 and 10 launchers on their panels, for rapid access to key applications. We want to preserve that sense of having a few favorite applications that are instantly accessible. Rather than making it equally easy to access any installed application, we assume that almost everybody will run one of a few apps, and they need to switch between those apps and any others which might be running, very easily. We focused on maximising screen real estate for content. In particular, we focused on maximising the available vertical pixels for web browsing. Netbooks have screens which are wide, but shallow. Notebooks in general are moving to wide screen formats. So vertical space is more precious than horizontal space. We also want to embrace touch as a first class input. We want people to be able to launch and switch between applications using touch, so the launcher must be finger friendly.

September 2009

Ubuntu Netbook Remix | Canonical

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Ubuntu Netbook Remix is optimised to run on a new category of affordable Internet-centric devices called netbooks. It includes a new consumer-friendly interface that allows users to quickly and easily get on-line and use their favourite applications. This interface is optimised for a retail sales environment.