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PUBLIC MARKS from tadeufilippini with tags todo & "windows linux"

03 August 2007 20:45

Wine HQ - Wine HowTo

How to help get applications working in Wine If you want to help get an application working in Wine, the first thing you should do is register yourself in the applications database and use one of your votes to indicate that you'd like more effort to be spent on the application. Every once in a while, a Wine developer will finish a project and look for something to do - combing through the higher voted apps to find one that people need work on is a great way to spend one's time and fill up a todo list. If the application that you want working is not listed in the applications database, there is an easy to use form available for you to add it. If the application is in the database, but lacks a maintainer, you should consider becoming one. If you are familiar with Wine and have a desire to test the application and help get or keep it working, please apply by clicking the link in the application's page. Each application should have a supermaintainer, and, if different versions of the application are substantially different (such as in Internet Explorer), each subversion should have a maintainer. Please don't feel deterred by the need to apply to become a maintainer - the application form is largely a formality to prevent abuse and we can virtually guarantee your acceptance. If you are the developer or publisher of the application, you obviously have a very big incentive to help get your application working under Wine. Fortunately, there are many options available to you other than reporting bugs and hoping someone will fix them. By far the easiest way is to simply send free copies of your software to Wine developers and hope they'll take an interest in getting it working. You'd be amazed how effective this approach can be, particularly for games. An alternative option, perhaps more effective and expensive, is to pay Wine developers for their work on your application, either directly through a negotiated contract or indirectly by posting a bounty. CodeWeavers, a major Wine developer, offers a special section for pledges at their compatibility center website. The most direct method, however, is to help develop Wine itself and contribute code directly, which is exactly what Corel did for WordPerfect several years ago. In any case, making a post on the Wine developers email list can go a long way