public marks

PUBLIC MARKS from pvergain with tags web & wordpress

July 2007

AroundWord

AroundWord is a free and open Blog Publishing System built upon the great web framework Pylons. Currently, AroundWord is in early planning and development. You are welcome to take participate in the development: Main Features * Multi-user * Atom/RSS feeds * Trackbacks * OpenID for users that want to comment (this would avoid to use anti-spam feauture) * Anti-spam * Plugin * Theme * Tags * Multi-blog ? (but with a different data base for each blog) * Plug-in system * Easy to install for end users (as easy as wordpress if possible) Development Currently, we are building the models. More details about development here (http://www.aroundword.org/wiki/AroundWordDevelopment) The AroundWord team is happy to take contributions, patches and bug-fixes. We use the following code conventions: * PEP 8 - Style Guide for Python Code * PEP 257 - Docstring Conventions The Mercurial repository can be accessed via: http://hg.aroundword.org/ AroundWord is a free and open Blog Publishing System built on Python using the most advanced technologies: * Framework: Tesla upon Pylons * Database Engine: SQLAlchemy + Elixir + SAContext * Templates: Mako * Widgets and Forms: ToscaWidgets + twForms + FormEncode * Authorization and Authentication: AuthKit * Internationalization (i18n) and Localization (L10n): Babel * JavaScript Library: jQuery * Site Search: Xapian

January 2007

Using WordPress as CMS | blogHelper

by 2 others
WordPress (WP) has always been a highly versatile blogging platform, even way back in v1.2. So versatile that many have attempted to push it to the next level, and use it as a more conventional content management system (CMS) - not unlike Drupal, XOOPS, Joomla, and gang. And if the coverage a recent post on using WordPress to run a magazine or news website got is indicative of the interest people have in pushing the limits of WP, then there’s still a whole bucket load of it now. So, here’s little me starting a series of posts on Using WordPress as a CMS - from the more theoretical to the more practical (sub)topics. Hopefully, the things I’ve learnt while playing with WP so far will come in useful to some of you.