public marks

PUBLIC MARKS from decembre with tags xml & greasemonkey

December 2009

Advanced Greasemonkeying — Yoan Blanc’s weblog

Jouant occasionnellement avec Greasemonkey, j’ai fait face a des problèmes récurrent liés à l’architecture de l’extention elle-même. * Comment réutiliser une bibliothèque déjà présente dans la page, * comment traiter un résultat XML * ou qu’est-ce qui fait que je n’arrive pas à mettre une Yahoo!/Google maps dynamiquement. Réutiliser une librairie(, fonction, variable) existante

September 2009

UserScript Writing 101 – Manuel of Things to learn - Userscripts.org

The Order of Things to Learn Look to the "Resources" section for places to learn about these. 1. HTML. Hypertext Markup Language. Not the same "language" as JavaScript. This is a markup language, meaning it's a bunch of text that is meant to represent some type of structure, in this case, a web page. 2. XML. Extensible Markup Language. In case you didn't realize, HTML itself is a type of "XML". Learning XML is important because many popular websites (YouTube, Facebook, Last.fm) use XML to interact with data. Since you already know HTML by this point, understanding XML should be cake. 3. CSS. Cascading Style Sheets. This is the way HTML (should be) stylized. You'll want to learn this. 4. JavaScript. Learn all the basics: data types, functions, JavaScript's native functions like prompt, alert, etc. 5. The Greasemonkey Extras. Like I said, Greasmonkey == JavaScript, with a lot of extras. A specific page listing the API's can be found here.

June 2009

Curiosity is bliss: XMLHttpRequest - Security Bypass

While trying to help Dare make his MovieFinder page run in Firefox, I ran into an issue that can make developing AJAX applications a pain: when testing your pages, you need to host them in the same domain as your services. I explain the details of the problem and how the "XMLHttpRequest - Bypass Security" Greasemonkey user script solves it. Note: this script is meant for development only, as it gives the page access to a potentially dangerous API. The default @include is "file:///*", but feel free to restrict it even further to the path for the pages you're trying to tweak. You should never have to @include an http ur

April 2008

XPath Tutorial

by 2 others
XPath is a language for finding information in an XML document. XPath is used to navigate through elements and attributes in an XML document.