public marks

PUBLIC MARKS from decembre with tags flickr & dev


FLICKT - mars 2015 - Introducing the New! Shiny ! Photolist framework -

Some photolist pages on Flickr use infinite scrolling, and some display results one page at a time. Regardless of how a page shows its photos, it starts to feel messy when there is an incomplete row of photos hanging off the end of the page. If there is more content in the set, the last row should be full. However, since we fetch photos from the API in fixed batch sizes, things don’t always work out so nicely, leaving “leftovers” in the bottom row. Borrowing from typesetting terminology, we call these leftover photos orphans. (We can also paginate backwards; leftovers at the top are technically widows but we’ll just keep using the term orphans for simplicity.)


FLICKR - WEB Flickr API Forum

Discussion group and support for the Flickr API


data: URI Generator - Convert Online Tool for Icon, image to import it in greasemonkey Script -

data: URI Generator The data: URI scheme allows you to build URLs that embed small data objects. data: URIs are supported by most modern browsers except for Internet Explorer. The lack of IE support is holding back widespread adoption of data: URIs, but they are still very useful in a couple of specific areas such as embedding graphics and other data items in Greasemonkey scripts. You can read more about data: URIs and see some examples of their use, or use the generator below to create your own. data: URIs are defined in RFC 2397.

Flickr touchscreen on Flickr - Photo Sharing!

Touchscreen to browse Astronomy Photographer of the Year. Built in Flash, using YQL to get photos from Flickr. All put together by Ben, Adrian and Natasha from the Maritime Museum web team, working with freelance Flash programmer Ken Chan. I did a little bit of the YQL and ActionScript programming.

e2publish (Beta) - to develop an online desktop publishing application - Daniel Freeman (MAC et maybe PC)

This is a work in progress. The first beta test prototype of an ambitious idea. The vision is to develop an online desktop publishing application that would ultimately create documents that resemble the pages of a magazine. In the future, I'd like to create a service that allowed many authors to contribute to online publications, and also manage subscribers. I made the layout and placement of images very powerful. A user can easily drag images and drop them to break up text, even between columns. Wherever images are placed on a page, the text arranges itself to wrap around them. This is the only flash-based word processor that incorporates such a powerful capability. Please try out this early prototype. I'd love to know what other developers think. How it can be improved? Suggested new features and bug reports? Known limitations with this beta version: Picture resizing can be a bit wobbly...... Actually, I haven't even tried this application on a PC.

Greasemonkey comes to Chrome - get your userscripts ready!

Chrome has a secret weapon. His name is Aaron Boodman, and he created Greasemonkey. He now works on the Chrome Extensions team at Google. Even though Greasemonkey on Chrome isn't yet as mature as the Firefox version -- 15-25% of scripts might not work on Chrome yet -- it will definitely get there with Boodman's help. If you need some scripts to get you started, you can scope out Download Squad's 10 Greasemonkey Scripts You Shouldn't Browse Without, or peruse the large selection at


SML Wiki: Interestingness(note: work in progress)

Interestingness is a media (images, videos, etc) ranking algorithm to provide as an additional metric for search results. The algorithm is based upon an algorithm created by the Flickr team, and is further enhanced by metadata knowledge resulted from the development. The algorithm was first unveiled publicly on Flickr on 2005-08-01.1 SML.SML: Interestingness = f(views, faves, comments, tags, time, user, network relationships); The ranking is based on one or more of the following factors: * the quantity of user-entered metadata2 (i.e. tags) * the number of users who have assigned metadata3 * the number of favorites assigned to the photo4 * relationship between the person who uploaded the photo and the people who are commenting5 * access patterns related to the media object6 (i.e. where the clickthroughs are coming from; who comments on it and when)7 * a lapse of time related to the media object8 (i.e. velocity of metadata acquisition)